Monthly Archives: May 2017

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Everything You Need to Know About Attending La Boheme

By | Ayre | No Comments

We’re looking forward to seeing you at La Boheme

Doors open at 7:30pm. The show begins at 8pm, and is approximately 2.5 hours including two 20-minute intermissions (so you can refresh our pianist’s drink at the bar).

Tickets

Please note: This email is not your ticket. Check your inbox for your electronic tickets from TicketLeap, which you can print or display to us on your phone/tablet for entry. (In the TicketLeap email, click the link “Download the barcode ticket”.) NB: If you can’t find your tickets, we can scan you in by first & last name. Just bring a government-issued ID.

All tickets are general admission and seating is cabaret-style, available on a first-come, first-seated basis. (So the earlier you arrive, the quicker you can choose your seat!) But don’t worry: If you have a ticket, you are guaranteed a seat. This venue is wheelchair accessible.

I can't find my ticket / I have a ticketing question

At-the-door/Rush Tickets

Have a friend who wants to attend the performance? Advance tickets for #AtGBoheme are now off-sale due to record-breaking interest. But! They can buy Rush Tickets (seated or standing room) at the door and line up for these (as early as 7pm or 7:30pm) outside the Tranzac. So far all people in the Rush line have been able to get in!

 

tranzac

About the Tranzac Club

Located off Bloor Street West, on 292 Brunswick Avenue, the historic Tranzac Club is one of the oldest dive bars in Toronto — and the site of our original 2011 production of #AtGBoheme.

The club is actually a multi-story performance space, with two front rooms and a second floor. We are performing on the main floor, in the back space.

 

map

Getting here

Tranzac Club
292 Brunswick Ave, Toronto, ON M5S 1Y2

By car (Free parking after 6pm!)

PAID Green P Parking lots: 365 Lippincott S Of Bloor, Toronto, or 4 Spadina Rd, 334 TO 350 Bloor St W, Toronto, ON M5V3Y9. PAID metre parking on Bloor West (FREE after 9pm). FREE street parking (6pm–8am) on Brunswick Ave and residential side streets. Note: Brunswick is a one-way street, going south.

By TTC

Nearest subway stops: Bathurst or Spadina Station. Nearest 510 streetcar stop: Bloor & Spadina or Harbord & Spadina. Nearest bus stop: Harbord & Brunswick (94 Bus).

By bike

Bike locks available at the corner of Bloor and Brunswick. Bike lanes off Bloor, Harbord and Spadina.

Accessibility

The Tranzac Club’s entrance is fully accessible. Pull up in front of 292 Brunswick Ave and stop for a direct drop-off if desired. Note: Brunswick is a one-way street, going south.

life

What to expect

Drinks!

In keeping with the AtG spirit, The Tranzac is fully equipped with a bar (cash or Visa, ATM on site) right in our performance space, so you can bring your drinks to your seats.

Life-drawing!

You’ll notice that inside the venue, members of Toronto’s Ex Libris Arts (Jessie Durham and Dmitry Bondarenko) are recording our performances through a medium Puccini’s boho characters would approve of: life-drawing. Their sketches are for sale and they love chatting with curious appreciators of art, so visit them during the intermissions.

Discover Ex Libris Arts

Smartphones on and out!

Take photos and live-tweet all night, including during the show! (Just no flash, and absolutely no audio or video recording, please.) Use the hashtag #AtGBoheme and tag @AtGTheatre (social links below).

 

What to read

Check out these articles and previews

4 NNNNs: La Bohème set in contemporary Toronto soars | NOW Magazine

“English version of Puccini’s classic will entertain long-time opera fans and newcomers.”

Against the Grain’s La Bohème is Back for Round 2 | The Globe and Mail

“[With this production, they now stand as one of the most creative theatrical and musical grounds in the country.”

How a Toronto Neighbourhood Inspired a Homeground La Bohème | Musical Toronto

“The production’s accessibility to Toronto is unmissable, with references to familiar locations [like Future’s Bakery and BMV].”

A Very Bohemian Undertaking | Schmopera

“Would [Puccini] be proud? Probably not,” says Joel Ivany with a wry smile, of Against the Grain Theatre’s updated, translated version of La Bohème.

Read the house program Read more reviews

 

 

Photos:

Kimy Mc Laren as Mimi and Owen McCausland as Rodolfo in La Bohème 2017, Photo: Darryl Block
Tranzac Club, Photo: blogTO
Adanya Dunn as Musetta in La Bohème 2017, Photo: Darryl Block

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The reviews are in: La Boheme

By | AtG in the News, La Boheme, Press | No Comments

"Modest in concept but rich in imagination, it’s the don’t-miss performance of the month."

− Toronto Life

"AtG's La bohème is just as likely to make you laugh as it is to make you cry."

− Schmopera

"The production’s accessibility to Toronto audiences is unmissable, with references to familiar locations like Future’s Bakery and William Lyon MacKenzie on the Canadian currency."

− Musical Toronto

"With this production, they now stand as one of the most creative theatrical and musical groups in the country."

− The Globe and Mail

"It's intelligent, funny and very millennial... Topher Mokrzewski seems to play more notes on the piano than two hands have ever played — his orchestral reduction is lush."

− Broadway World

"A raucous, energetic, site-specific version of La Bohème, performed in an Annex club and featuring characters who are completely true to the spirit of Puccini’s original while also commenting on contemporary issues like soaring rents, hookup culture and millennial underemployment."

− NOW Magazine

Read the reviews:

La Boheme set in contemporary Toronto soars | NOW Magazine

AtG’s La bohème Revival Fresh And Endearing | Musical Toronto

La Bohème Review | Opera Going Toronto

AtG’s La Bohème six years on | Operaramblings

Hype for a reason: AtG’s La bohème | Schmopera

Rent in the 6ix Meets Opera in Against the Grain Theatre’s LA BOHÈME | Broadway World

Against the Grain’s La Bohème II closes a sold-out run | Definitely the Opera

Read the previews:

Against The Grain’s La Bohème is back for round 2 | The Globe and Mail

A very Bohemian undertaking | Schmopera

How A Toronto Neighbourhood Inspired A Homegrown La bohème | Musical Toronto

A comprimario amid a “huge, sweeping, romantic love story” | Schmopera

A free Meat Loaf concert, an opera in a bar and six other things to see, do, read and hear this week | Toronto Life

CRITIC’S PICKS: 9 Classical Music Shows You Should Absolutely See This Week | Musical Toronto

 

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The Rent is Too Damn High

By | La Boheme | No Comments

Each week, the editors of  La Bohème newspaper pick a theme for their issue, and solicit real stories from real Torontonians. This week’s story: “The Rent Is Too Damn High”

Recently, Craigslist listed a semi-private studio apartment for $1,750/month. This apartment, which the ad described as being “full of character” and offering “a unique immersive experience of Toronto’s vibrant street life,” is actually an unroofed laneway off Brunswick Avenue.

“When you look around, there’s no realer place for a writer. This is what Balzac and Hugo were talking about,” Rodolfo said. An aspiring screenwriter, he rents the laneway with an OCAD student named Marcello, who is is transforming their refurbished furniture into an art project for GradEx. “It’s a conversation-starter with our guests. Or any pedestrians that wander into the laneway, really. And the silver lining is there’s always a parking space available. If we ever have a car, that’ll be cool.” Originally from Ottawa, Rodolfo was unfamiliar with Toronto’s neighbourhoods, but he’d seen Kids in the Hall, and, he said, “I pretty much knew I was going to live in the West End.”

Rodolfo continues, “The rent is pretty reasonable for this area.” He’d checked out one-bedroom apartments in Queen West, where the average monthly rent is $1,900 (plus utilities) a month. He almost signed one of those apartments but he didn’t have the necessary paperwork to close the deal: landlords now demand 10 post-dated cheques, first and last month’s rent, a cleaning deposit, a repair deposit (your landlord isn’t going to fix that thing on their own), a reference letter from all former employers going back five years, dental records, access to social media accounts and, in some cases, a fresh urine sample. So, Rodolfo eventually landed here: the Mirvish Village laneway with “unbeatable” rent.

The laneway is prone to intermittent power outages. The thin insulation makes heating a wild fantasy. (From the ad: “This laneway has EXPOSED BRICK! The brick from the outside of the building is visible from inside the laneway!!!”) The smell can only be described as “ripe.” And the landlord prefers the housemates have “NO guests and MUST be there as little as possible during the day.” But its location boasts the the Holy Trinity of “B’s” worshipped by every twentysomething: Beer, brunch, and BMV.

And, Rodolfo adds, “It could be worse. At least it’s not Liberty Village, right?”

When asked for comment, landlord Benoît Baule stated that he planned to raise the rent by $250 a month when the current lease expires in June.

In this issue, we tackle the beast that is the Toronto rental market (will it cool down with Ontario’s recently introduced Fair Housing Plan?), hear from the other side (the landlord), and profile broke folks still living large and aspiring to the bourgeois life.

Image: blogTO

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What I learned from trying (and failing and trying again) to evict my deadbeat tenants

By | La Boheme | No Comments

Gregory FinneyBy Benoît Baule, special to La Bohème

Each week, the editors of La Bohème newspaper pick a theme for their issue, and solicit real stories from real Torontonians. In our “Rent Is Too Damn High” issue, our Perspectives Column was penned by concerned citizen and landlord Benoît Baule.

We’ve all read stories about the lousy kinds of landlords around our great city. In the last few years, “The Six” has seen a spate of terrible, just terrible landlords treating their tenants badly. They ignore repairs, raise the rent, or evict without notice — you name it. But, I have to ask: What do you do if it’s the tenants who are the problem?

I live in the West End* and I’ve been a very successful, very trustworthy landlord in Toronto for many years. I rent properties in Corso Italia, Little Italy, the Annex and the former Mirvish Village area — and I have to tell you, nobody’s ever had a problem with me. Ask any of my old renters and they’ll say, “Benoît? Big Ben? Most trustworthy landlord I ever had. What a guy.”**

Now, the problem tenants in question, who are a couple of young guys, rent an apartment on Brunswick Street. I admit it’s no Palais Royale. But I charge a modest, competitive rate and I include hot water and a parking space — and they still act like they live in a cave. I just heard complaints that they were burning a fire — a literal fire — in the living room for heat, which I’m sure is because they had their electricity cut for not paying their bills. I haven’t gotten a rent payment from these two “artists” in months, but whenever I show up to get my money, guess what? There’s always drinks available! I have a line of potential renters who would kill for a great apartment like this one, and wouldn’t stiff me month after month with promises of “Once my script gets picked up” and on and on…

I’m a patient guy, and I’ve tried many, many times to get them out of there. Somehow, they end up appealing to my sense of goodwill and charity, and I give them another chance. My wife was right, I need to be tougher with these tenants. But I can’t help it. I guess I’m just a humanist.

I’ve got no choice left but to go over there and give them official notice that come the New Year, New People will be living in that space — ones who’ll understand that you can’t take advantage of Big Ben.

———

*Oakville

**Note from the Editor: Former tenants declined to respond to our request for veracity.